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Positive Parenting: Parenting And Emotion

Positive Parenting: Parenting and Emotion

How parents deal with their own emotions can also impact their kids.

From reading to complex math equations, children learn new things every day. Now researchers are examining how kids learn to express their emotions.

A parent’s example might be an important factor.

Sad, happy or angry. Kids have to deal with all types of emotions. Scientists have been looking at what affects children’s emotion regulation or the way they process their feelings.

After a series of studies, they concluded that three main factors help determine how kids deal with emotions: the way parents express their own emotions; how moms and dads parent with their emotions; and the general emotional climate of the family.

In a nutshell, researchers found children have trouble regulating emotions when their parents are overly harsh, controlling, or permissive.

When parents control their emotions, kids are better at regulating their emotions. Coaching kids on how to deal with anger, such as labeling their emotions, can also help them cope more effectively.

And helping your kids communicate their feelings could lead to better social and emotional health down the road.

Setting clear rules and limits can also help kids express their emotions in a positive way. For example, you can say “anger is okay. But hitting is not.” The study authors say a parent’s influence on emotion regulation starts in early childhood, possibly infancy and continues through adulthood.

 

Positive Parenting: Building Your Child’s Math Confidence

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Spiders, the boogeyman and things that go bump in the night. There’s so many things that kids are afraid of, but could a parent’s fear also rub off on them, especially when it comes to school achievement?

Did you know about 30 percent of workers around the world use algebra at least once a week as part of their job? As the need for advanced math skills in high-demand stem jobs grows, deep-rooted math anxiety may be holding them back. But how can parents turn that around, early on?

Researchers at the University of Chicago had a group of first graders participate in math story time with parents at home. They found that the kids who did short numerical story problems significantly increased their math achievement throughout the school year compared to kids who only read at home.

This was especially true for kids whose parents were anxious about math. So parents, use everyday activities like cooking dinner, setting the table, and reading stories together as opportunities. These small math interactions can go a long way toward building your child’s math confidence.

The app that was used in the study with the first graders was called Bedtime Math. It is available on the iPhone, iPad and Android. It is also available in both English and Spanish.

Copyright 2018 by KSAT – All rights reserved.

 

Positive Parenting: Building Academic Confidence

Homework can be a painful, daily ritual for many parents and kids.

But researchers say how parents treat math can have a big effect on child performance.

About 30 percent of workers around the world use algebra at least once a week as part of their job.

As the need for advanced math skills in high-demand stem jobs grows, deep-rooted math anxiety may be holding some kids back.

Parents can help turn that around early on, but that means even the parents who don’t like mat have to take an interest.

Researchers at the University of Chicago had a group of first graders participate in math story time with parents at home.

They found that the kids who did short numerical story problems significantly increased their math achievement throughout the school year compared to kids who only read at home.

This was especially true for kids whose parents were anxious about math.

So parents can use everyday activities like cooking dinner, setting the table and reading stories together as opportunities to add simple arithmetic into everyday life.

These small math interactions can go a long way toward building your child’s math confidence.

The app that was used in the study with the first graders was called Bedtime Math.

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